Watt Watchers of Texas: Texas is Too Good To Waste™

Investigating Potential and Kinetic Energy

Grade Level:

Activity Overview: The first law of thermodynamics states that energy in a closed system can neither be created nor destroyed but rather goes through a series of conversions from one form to another. The details of several conversions anchor the fundamentals of thinking about energy more concretely as a global industrial sector.

Time: The activity should take less than one class period and is also appropriate for a homework assignment.

Problem Statement

Review the following table adapted from Chapter 4 of Energy 101. Investigate examples of kinetic and potential energy and their transformations. Which of these forms of energy store potential energy? Which of them are examples of kinetic energy? Are there forms that combine both? Students should demonstrate well reasoned responses in their investigation and properly reference any external sources.

ConversiónSímboloDescripción
Termomecánicat→mde calor a movimiento (motores)
Termoquímicac→t,
t→c
de energía química a calor (combustión) o de calor a cambios químicos (refinamiento, destilación, fundición)
Termonucleara→tcalor de reacciones nucleares
Electroquímicae→c,
c→e
reacciones químicas que producen electricidad (celdas de combustible, baterías, etc.) o reacciones en las que la electricidad produce un cambio químico (electrólisis)
Electromecánicae→m,
m→e
generadores, motores eléctricos
Fotoeléctrica, fotovoltaica, optoelectrónicar→e,
e→r
de luz a electricidad, de electricidad a luz
Fotoquímicac→r,
r→c
fotosíntesis, velas de parafina

For example: Thermonuclear conversions transform atomic energy into thermal energy. They convert kinetic energy stored within the strong forces of atoms into the kinetic energy of the atomic components separating rapidly during nuclear fission.

Resources

Chapter 4: Energy Basics from Energy 101: Energy Technology & Policy provides an introduction to the laws of thermodynamics and energy conversions. Access to Energy 101 for Texas students and teachers is provided for free by the State Energy Conservation Office as part of the Watt Watchers of Texas program.

TEKS

PHYS.6B

Printed from wattdev.wpengine.com. Copyright © 2018 The University of Texas at Austin.
linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram